Tankless in Seattle

May 21, 2012

Tankless Water Heaters in SeattleYou can find a good-sized tank heater for a decent price in many places, but these inexpensive heaters may not always be the bargain they seem to be.

These are typically in the 40-50 gallon range, and they will heat water so that you have that many gallons available when you need to wash dishes, take a shower, wash the dog, or whatever.

The tank unit works by warming that amount of water and then holding it ready, just in case you need it. This means the water is kept at a steady 160 degrees (or whatever temperature you set it to), at all times of day.

The heater thus is going on and off all day and all night to keep the water hot. Your Seattle electric bill reflects this.

It sounds like that cheap water heater may not be so cheap, doesn’t it? Yikes!

Hot Water Loss and Limited Supply

Traditional tank heaters lose heat steadily. As the tank stands full with hot water, that warmth is lost through heat that basically seeps away. Picture a tea or coffee mug. As the tea or coffee cools, that heat is lost.

Even though your heater is insulated, there is still significant heat lost as it radiates away. That heat loss can be as much as 20 to 40%.

Another drawback of traditional “cheap” water heaters is that the hot water can get used up. If one person takes a shower, he may actually use up all the water that is hot. Then the next person needs to wait 30-60 minutes to get hot shower.

What a drag!

An Efficient Alternative to Cheap Water Heaters

Consider a tankless heater. You may also have heard of these called “point-of-use” heaters, “on-demand” heaters, or “electric instant hot water heaters.”

What this means is that the heater provides hot water when you need it.

There is no water stored. When you turn on the hot faucet, the on-demand heater warms up the water so you can take a shower for as long as you want, and then lets the next person shower, too – all without running out of hot water.

Why is this a better alternative to the cheap tank heaters you find at your Seattle home improvement store?

Quite simply, cheap water heaters do not prove to be cheap in the long run.

Benefits of “Cheap Water Heaters”

You may want to reconsider what you think a cheap water heater is, since the research has shown that what may have been the cheap heater initially may not be the cheap heater in the long run.

Point-of-use tank heaters can be initially more expensive. However, think about this: Point-of-use heaters can save as much as 50% over your current heating expenses! An on-demand heater will only provide hot water when you need it, so there is no need to continue to heat water if you aren’t using it. No more day-and-night heating bills.

On-demand heaters are also cheap heaters because they don’t wear out like traditional tank units. Traditional units have a typical life of 6 to 12 years before needing to be replaced.

A tankless water heater can last 20 years and more, since they don’t have hot water “sitting” in the tank and corroding internal parts. Hard water scale and deposits can greatly reduce the life and efficiency of a tank heater.

Tankless heaters are also space-efficient. They take up a lot less room in your Seattle home than their traditional counterparts. Imagine having your water heater hang on the wall, taking up only as much space as a briefcase!

One other benefit of this type of cheap water heater is their safety record. Traditional tank heaters require you to set a minimum temperature, which is often much higher than you really need. Point-of-use heaters allow you to set the temperature where you will use it, preventing scalding issues and more energy loss.

So what do you think? Which is really the cheap water heater?

You may find it helpful to consult your Seattle plumber, who can provide you with extensive information about tankless water heaters, and when you’ve reached your decision, safely and efficiently install your water heater.

 

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/home-improvement-articles/cheap-water-heater-but-is-it-really-cheaper-4135186.html

 

Click here or call 877-694-5176 to schedule an appointment.

Why Tacoma Tankless Water Heaters Make Sense

October 26, 2011

Tacoma Tankless Water Heaters Tankless water heaters are also known as instant water heaters.  These units make sense for homeowners for several reasons. In vacation homes they can be very desirable.  Here are some of the main reasons why tankless water heaters make sense as opposed to the traditional water heater.

 

1.  Tankless water heaters conserve energy.  Traditional water heaters have a tank that is constantly filled with water. The traditional water heater provides hot water in your home by constantly heating the water in the tank to maintain it at a set temperature. Tacoma tankless water heaters work differently.  Tankless units heat water by activating a set of coils that become hot when the unit is turned on. As the water passes over the coils, it is heated.  The temperature set on the control determines how hot the water will be when it comes out of the tap and, thus, how hot the coils become and how quickly the water moves across the coils.  Tankless water heaters conserve energy by only heating the amount of water needed at a given moment and by heating the water only when it is needed.

 

2.  Tankless water heaters are perfect for vacation and second homes.  When you are not staying in a second home or a vacation home, it is always wise to turn off any appliances and utilities not in use.  This saves money and protects your property.  Use of tankless water heaters in these second homes eliminates the risk of a leaking water heater tank, eliminates the cost of leaving the water heater running when the house is not in use, and eliminates the long wait when you do use the house while the gallons and gallons of water in the tank reach the desired temperature.

 

3.  Tankless water heaters are a perfect idea when water must travel from one end of the house (where the hot water heater is located) to the other end of the house (a second or third bathroom).  If you are serious about conserving water, consider the amount of water used when you run water waiting for the hot water to reach the tap you are using.  If there is only a short distance between the water heater and the tap, you might not waste a lot of water. But if the water must travel to the other end of the house, you could waste a large amount of water and you might find that the water cools somewhat as it passes through the pipes. A tankless water heater provides instant hot water at the desired temperature.

 

If you are a homeowner interested in conserving water, conserving energy, or protecting your investment in a second home or a vacation home, you might want to consider installing tankless water heaters.

Tacoma Tankless Water Heaters Benefits

December 23, 2010

Have you ever thought about getting a Tacoma tankless water heater, based off a plumber’s recommendation? Tankless water heaters are definitely something you should be looking into.

Tankless water heaters, sometimes known as instantaneous, continuous flow or inline are the perfect alternative to conventional tank heaters.

They heat liquids on demand or instantly rather than keeping liquids in reserve like conventional tank heaters. They use less energy than tank heaters which in turns means lower energy bills for you.

They can be operated electrically or with natural gas or propane. Gas ones can heat more liquid faster while electric ones need access to a lot of electric power to rapidly heat water.

They are very efficient when it comes to energy conservative. They have efficiency ratings at nearly 99%.

Most supply hot water for the whole house including appliances. The ones that supply hot water for the whole house are largest of the heaters. Point-of-use tankless water heaters are smaller units and can be placed under sinks or other easy access areas.

Point-of-use Tacoma tankless water heater units provide hot water for a specific outlet versus the whole house. They are located right where the water is being used and save more energy than centrally installed tankless water heaters, but are usually used in combination with a central water heater because of their small tank size.

Generally speaking, they are good choices because they don’t take up much space and can be hidden out of site. So, you won’t have to worry about people looking at it.

Here are a few reasons why you should look into them…

• Unlimited hot water – As liquid is heated while passing through the system an unlimited supply of hot water is available with a tankless water heater however, this can also be a disadvantage as running out of hot water self-limits use while a tankless heater has no such limit.
• Size – They can be mounted under a sink, in an easy access area, or anywhere else you think would be a good location. Because there is no tank, the places of where it can go are virtually endless.
• Water damage is minimized – They have no tanks to store liquid, so there are no chances of water damage do to a leak or hole in the tank. There are still risks of water damage from faulty parts such as improper piping or bad fittings.
• Longevity – They have no tanks meaning they will outlast the conventional heater twice as many years because corrosion is due to standing water in the tank. The corrosion will be on the pipes or around the fittings vs. the tank.
• Environmentally Friendly – They are designed to only use gas and water when they are being used. Therefore, you are not wasting resources to heat the water in a conventional heater.

Going Green With Tacoma Tankless Water Heaters

October 19, 2010

Traditional water heaters are highly inefficient and use a vast amount of unnecessary power. With the emergence of tankless water heaters, however, you have an option that reliably provides hot water while additionally saving you money on electric costs. Going with the greener, Tacoma tankless water heater might be the best option for you and your family, particularly if you are relying on an antiquated system that needlessly wastes electricity in heating and storing water. Tankless options are different, and their installation will have immediate savings.

A conventional heater works by pumping cold water into the bottom of the tank and heating this water, which rises to the top of the tank to be propelled into your home plumbing when a hot water faucet is turned. Yet, these units are inefficient on two fronts: first, it requires a vast amount of electricity to initially heat the water that enters the storage tank and, second, such water heaters require a constant supply of power to maintain hot water capacity.

Think of your Tacoma home’s regular heating or cooling system. Typically, you will only heat or cool your home when you are actually present and need temperature control. A conventional water heater, however, would be like running your home’s air conditioning or heating consistently regardless of whether you’re there or need such temperature control. Tankless options, on the other hand, supply hot water on demand. By doing so, these heaters can deliver immediate energy saving that benefits our planet in addition to your checkbook.

There are nevertheless some details that you should consider when going ahead with a tankless water heater installation. Of course, there are a number of technical issues: one needs to consider the voltage and amperage of the proposed unit in order to ensure that your home can properly handle the heater’s electrical current. Additionally, and like many conventional units, it may be necessary to put your tankless water heater on its own circuit. Finally, your estimate for demand will be extremely helpful in determining the size of the heater to be installed.

One of the more encouraging notions about tankless units is that they can be customized to just about any application. One can install individual heaters for individual appliances, such as a dish washer or sink, or one can install a unit capable of reliably proving hot water to an entire household or apartment complex. Whatever the application you have in mind, be assured that a tankless water heater is up to the challenge.

Naturally, it is important to consult a licensed electrician when considering tankless option installation for it’s is necessary to confirm the correct electrical diagnostics before purchasing the proper unit.



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