Plumbing Blog

Chemical Drain Cleaners, Electrons And More.

Why do drains clog? The short answer is because of the way we use them. Obviously, even though it’s not supposed to happen, water isn’t the only thing going down most drains. In fact, knowing what has clogged your drain can be an important step in knowing how to clear the clog. At the kitchen sink, grease and small particles of food can make their way into the drain. In the bathroom, hair and soap scum are the biggest offenders. Over time, these substances can build up and begin to line the drain, and then one day, another piece of food or another clump of hair is all it takes to block the drain [source: Goodway].

Foreign objects, such as jewelry, bottle tops or toys, can also fall into a drain and clog it. If that’s the case, drain cleaners won’t help unblock the drain. You’ll need to remove the object or call  your Seattle plumber to do it for you.

Assuming your problem isn’t a foreign object, first try to locate the clog. Start by removing, checking and cleaning the stopper or strainer at the entrance to the drain. Some strainers are easily removed by hand, but others may require a screwdriver or pliers. Remove anything you can reach and then try pouring hot water down the drain.

The next step is to try using a plunger on the drain, and if that doesn’t work, try removing and cleaning the sink’s trap. After that, you may want to try a sewer snake, or auger. If none of these efforts works, it’s time to use a drain-cleaning product [source: Harrison].

Chemical Drain Cleaners

Be they liquid, gel or powder form, most of the drain cleaners you’ll find on store shelves use strong chemicals, and they come in liquid, gel and powder forms. All chemical reactions involve moving electrons, and drain cleaners work by either taking or giving electrons to the clogging substance, generating heat in the process. There are three main types of drain cleaners:

  • Caustic drain cleaners contain substances such as lye and caustic potash. They’re bases, so they give electrons to the clogging substance, and their hydroxide ions create the reaction that clears the clog. Their alkaline, or basic, chemicals release heat and turn grease into a soap-like substance that’s more easily dissolved. These drain cleaners are typically heavier than water, which enables them to reach the clog through standing water.
  • Oxidizing drain cleaners contain substances such as household bleach, peroxides and nitrates. These chemicals cause the organic material of the clog to lose electrons and become oxidized. The product is heavier than water, so it can move through standing water, and it releases heat and gas to help clear the blockage.
  • Acid drain cleaners aren’t commonly found in stores, and some are sold only to plumbers. These typically contain high concentrations of sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid, substances that increase hydronium ions in a solution and attract electrons from the clog. The hydronium ions react chemically with the material in the clog, and the reaction releases heat, which is necessary to melt congealed grease [source: Sheridan].

Because most of these products generate heat, they may soften the polyvinyl chloride, or PVC, pipes found in most Seattle homes today. However, such damage is rare if you use the drain cleaner as directed — damage is more likely to occur when drain cleaner is used on older, metal pipes.

Aside from their effect on the pipes in your Seattle home, there are other disadvantages to chemical drain cleaners. They’re extremely toxic if swallowed, and they can burn eyes, skin and mucous membranes and eat through clothing. They can release noxious fumes, and if used improperly, they can cause explosions. These products can also harm septic systems by killing beneficial bacteria, and they can mar bathroom and kitchen fixtures.

If you use chemical drain cleaners, read the directions carefully and heed all the warnings. Use the product in a well-ventilated area, wear rubber gloves, and keep children and pets away from the drain. Never mix different drain cleaners, and don’t use a plunger in conjunction with drain cleaners.

Most drain cleaners advise waiting 15 minutes or more after pouring the product into the drain before flushing it with hot water. If your drain is still clogged afterward, you may need to repeat the process. If a few tries yield no results, it may be time to give your Seattle plumber a call.

Article Source:  http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/plumbing/drain-cleaner1.htm

If you are looking for a Tacoma plumbing contractor, please call 877-694-5176 or complete our online request form.

Comments

Got something to say?

You must be logged in to post a comment.



watersense plumber credit cards


2010 © Hanson Home Services, LLC LLC DBA Rooter-Man. All rights reserved.
Home | Free Consultation | Articles | Terms | Site Map | Privacy


ROOTER-MAN - Service Areas

© Rooter-Man, All Rights Reserved
Rooter-Man
PO Box 732098
Puyallup, WA 98373
Phone: 877-694-5176
Fax: 253-840-2156

License #: ROOT*961LT
* 8 AM TO 5 PM - Monday thru Saturday (except holidays)

Google Reviews
Kudzu | Yelp

Local Plumbing Services
Licensed Plumbers

Plumbing Newsletter | Plumber Services | About A Tacoma Plumbing Company | Drain Cleaning | Plumbing Coupons

Tacoma Plumbers and Plumbing Contractors

Tacoma plumbing contractor and Seattle emergency plumber offers Certified backflow plumbing contractor, installation and testing, Leaky faucet repair / replacement, Dishwasher installation in Federal Way, Ice maker hook-ups, Toilet bowl repair / replacement, New faucet installation Shower diverter repair / replacement Sewer & drain cleaning, Water line repair / replacement, Water heater repair/ replacement, Sewer line repairs, Electronic leak & sewer location, Inline video inspection Garbage disposal repair/replacement, Slab leaks, Floor & wall furnace repair/replacement

King County, WA | Pierce County, WA | Redmond, WA | Puyallup, WA | Sumner, WA | Bonney Lake, WA | Tacoma, WA | Fife, WA | Federal Way, WA | Des Moines, WA | Auburn, WA | Kent, WA | SeaTac, WA | Seattle, WA | Tukwila, WA | Bellevue, WA | Issaquah, WA

Hot Water | Low Water Supply

Seattle Water Heaters

Storage water heaters are by far the most common type of water heater in the U.S. today. Ranging in size from 20 to 80 gallons (or larger) and fueled by electricity, natural gas, propane, or oil, storage water heaters work by heating up water in an insulated tank. When you turn on the hot water tap, hot water is pulled out of the top of the water heater and cold water flows into the bottom to replace it. Because heat is lost through the walls of the storage tank (this is called standby heat loss), energy is consumed even when no hot water is being used. New energy-efficient storage water heaters contain higher levels of insulation around the tank, substantially reducing standby heat loss.

We provide a comprehensive list of other plumbers throughout the United States. If you have ended up on this site and are not in need of a Washington Plumber, please review our other companies that provide emergency plumbing services.

Powered By Footbridge Media: Contractor Directory